Franklin Graham quit the GOP a while ago, and he’s still probably voting for Trump or Cruz

Multiple reports are circulating that Franklin Graham quit the GOP yesterday after the Republican-controlled Congress passed an omnibus spending bill that included funding for Planned Parenthood. The reports are based on this Facebook post, in which Graham cites the bill as “an example of why I have resigned from the Republican Party and declared myself Independent” before noting that he doesn’t trust the Democrats, Republicans or even the Tea Party “to do what is best for America.”

He’s not done with politics, though. Not by a damn sight. In announcing his resignation from an organized political party, he called on religious conservatives across the country to get more involved in the political process than they already are. He also suggested that he would soon launch an effort to influence the political process. As he wrote:

Franklin Graham

Franklin Graham

Unless more godly men and women get in this process and change this wicked system, our country is in for trouble. I want to challenge Christians, even pastors, across the country to pray about running for office where they can have an impact. We need mayors, country commissioners, city council members, school board members who will uphold biblical values.

In just a couple of weeks, I will begin going state by state to every capital in our nation to hold prayer rallies for our country and share this same challenge on the Decision America Tour. Des Moines, Iowa, is first on January 5. I hope you’ll join me in your capital—check decisionamericatour.com for more dates and details.

To be clear, none of this means that Graham quit the GOP yesterday. According to public voter registration information in Graham’s home state of North Carolina, he hasn’t had a partisan affiliation for quite some time. Furthermore, his insistence that he doesn’t have faith in any of America’s major political parties and his call for more Christians to go into politics are carbon copies of comments he made in April and May of this year.

Furthermore, none of this means that Graham isn’t going to continue to support Republican candidates for office. After all, he voted in the Republican primaries in 2014, 2012 and 2010 (North Carolina allows unaffiliated voters to vote in either the Republican or Democratic primaries in a given year). While Graham has said previously that he isn’t planning on endorsing a candidate in the Republican primary, he’s had kind words for Donald Trump. Trump, along with Ted Cruz, who has locked up the support of many of Graham’s fellow evangelical leaders, speaks to widespread conservative disaffection with Republican in Congress over their inability to force President Obama to sign on to his entire theocratic agenda.

These conservatives may not identify with the Republican Party anymore, but they absolutely love religious Republican candidates. So perhaps they’ll send Ben Carson $15 through the mail instead of responding to the RNC’s email begging them for cash, but rest assured: these are still Republican voters. They, along with Graham, aren’t going to sit out the 2016 election. For all of their bluster about the Republican Party having given them up, let them down, run them around and hurt them, they still think that Marco Rubio is a thousand times better for them than Hillary Clinton — despite Clinton’s deeply religious roots.

Something tells me that Franklin Graham will be more than happy to hold his nose and “settle” for Ted Cruz.


Jon Green graduated from Kenyon College with a B.A. in Political Science and high honors in Political Cognition. He worked as a field organizer for Congressman Tom Perriello in 2010 and a Regional Field Director for President Obama's re-election campaign in 2012. Jon writes on a number of topics, but pays especially close attention to elections, religion and political cognition. Follow him on Twitter at @_Jon_Green, and on Google+. .

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51 Responses to “Franklin Graham quit the GOP a while ago, and he’s still probably voting for Trump or Cruz”

  1. Mike_in_the_Tundra says:

    Obviously, you feel that Muslims are much worse than Christians when it comes to hatred. Google Pastor Kevin Swanson.

  2. Mike_in_the_Tundra says:

    I had a tia abuela who I thought was terribly bigoted. One day she said to me, “Michael, what you need is a good girl.” To which I snapped back, “No, what I need is a bad boy.” I realized how unbigoted she really was when she would repeat, with a big smile, her remark every time she saw me.

  3. woodroad34 says:

    ‘Freely’ based on his bigoted actions. My aunt was a devoted Southern Baptist — who screamed at me at my mother’s (her sister’s) funeral about how I was sleeping with a man– who had Billy Graham blasting on her radio (along with others) every single minute of the day. If Franklin didn’t go the extra mile to appease that type of bigoted audience, he’d lose their money.

  4. ComradeRutherford says:

    Christians used to do exactly the same things that Muslims do today, using the same justifications. Christianity is only a few hundred years older than Islam.

    And just as you gave me crap for lumping you in with the neo-facsist theocratic christians, now you are also blaming ALL muslims for what a tiny few do. Yes, there are muslims that “sell children, rape them, behead non-followers.” They account for .001% of the world’s muslim population. Don’t forget that.

  5. Mike_in_the_Tundra says:

    You have some unusual information. I lived for years in Minneapolis and would still live there, if my husband’s job had not required us to move. Minneapolis is not a Muslim stronghold. There are many Muslims there, but the number of Lutherans and Catholics vastly outnumber them.

    All the Muslims I met or with whom I came in contact have been friendly and accepting of others. I know some Muslims have done horrible things, but so have many Christianists. I refuse to call people like that Christians.

  6. jayyuma says:

    I am not an expert on the quran, and don’t want to be. I’ve heard enough about it. From what I’ve heard, muslems sell children, rape them, behead non-followers. I’ve seen the beheadings – watched them on the internet because I didn’t want to believe it without seeing. It’s not worth discussing – I don’t see Christians doing these things, and we haven’t seen anything like this before. Go visit Dearborn, MI, or Minneapolis, MN, or some of the other strongholds of muslems in the U.S. I don’t care to. I have faith in the things I’ve heard. I don’t need more proof.

  7. jayyuma says:

    Thanks for that. That is a ‘good’ thing. I hope that the reports I’ve been hearing are in error.

  8. ComradeRutherford says:

    “the quran and ‘Separation of Church and State’, are incompatible.”

    I don’t stipulate to that. Where in Q’ran does it say that religion must control political science?

    Have you read the Q’ran? I tried and couldn’t get through it (just like the bible), but I did like the part where Mohammed says (at the start of the book – paraphrasing) ‘I went out into the desert and prayed, and this is what I got out of it. If you don’t like what I say here, go into the desert and talk to god yourself and write your own book.’

  9. ComradeRutherford says:

    I was replying to your statement, “our Founding Fathers did agree that we were a ‘Christian’ nation.”

  10. Moderator3 says:

    I’m an elementary school teacher, and we still teach cursive (usually Zaner – Bloser).

  11. jayyuma says:

    And that income is from those who give freely.

  12. jayyuma says:

    I don’t know the man that well, in fact, hardly at all. But I am aware of his father’s legacy, and THAT has little to do with anything most of us would regard as ‘immoral’. However, as to your assertion that he is a ‘pandering, posturing liar, on top of everything else, including being a theocratic bigot who pines for America to become Jesusland’, other than the fact that he believes ‘morality’ is compatible with ‘Jesus’, and is a ‘good’ thing, where do you find that evidence. He’s not looking for the government to ‘punish’ those who disagree.

  13. jayyuma says:

    And as for the Kingdom of Heaven, thats for God to divvy out.

  14. jayyuma says:

    Oh yes I did: “I will not whine, and accept the criticism.”. I was in error.
    And yes, if I can believe the reportings, many, if not most, of this generation is not taught cursive. That is not a condemnation, only a sign that things are changing. I cannot change the courses of history, but do reserve the right to consider a good or bad thing. In my opinion, I believe it may be worthy talent in coming years.

  15. jayyuma says:

    I don’t believe that I said such a thing. Agreement (which I may have assumed (see above), and Founded, are very different, when discussing the ‘Law of the Land’.

  16. jayyuma says:

    O.K., so they didn’t agree that we were a Chrlstian nation, but Jefferson, though not so much a Christian, he was a deist, and did, from what I know, believe in a ‘supreme’ force which guided the events of humanity. Call that force what you like, and after the fact (he now ‘lives’ on the ‘other’ side) must know by now whether he was correct. And that being the case, may or may not be ‘spinning’. That would also go for Franklin. However, they did believe that religion and politics should be kept separate. He thought enough about theologies that because of the problems he had with the muslems, that he endeavored to actually read the quran, and did not believe that their ‘faith’ was compatible with our Constitution. He may or may not have been up to speed on Hinduism, Buddism, or whatever else, and may or may not have had the same feelings about Christianity, but did not actively try to keep any ‘believers’ out of government, but only that they keep it separate. And with that, I am in total agreement. My point, rather ineloquent, is that the quran and ‘Separation of Church and State’, are incompatible. And being a Christian, I do not believe the Bible and that particular doctrine are. I reject it when people assert such a thing.

  17. Mike_in_the_Tundra says:

    I sometimes get a lot of criticism for being Christian, and I’m sure you understand why I won’t deny it. However, there is nothing that would prove your statement about the Founding Fathers agreeing this was a Christian nation. In fact, I’m certain that just the idea has Thomas Jefferson spinning in his grave.

  18. ComradeRutherford says:

    No, the Founding Fathers made no such agreement.

    Since June 7, 1797, this has been the Law of the Land, “the Government of the United States of America is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion.”

  19. jayyuma says:

    The only thing which I might add, just so that I can be very precise in my disagreement (being NOT a Theocratic ‘christian’), is that although our Founding Fathers did agree that we were a ‘Christian’ nation, did assert that we were NOT a Theocratic ‘christian’ nation. Such is evidenced by their assertion of the ‘Separation of Church and State’ doctrine.

  20. Moderator3 says:

    You did not accept the criticism, or you would have just said, “I meant cursory.” It’s nice that you see yourself as better than this generation, but that’s hardly a Christian attitude. Think about the first Beatitude.

  21. jayyuma says:

    Thanks for the not-so-subtle slap. I obviously meant cursory. But then, one should always say what one means. But that in-breeding was not of my doing, and I will not whine (since I am certain that I – unlike most of this generation – cannot do the former), and will accept the criticism.

  22. ComradeRutherford says:

    Ah, I see: I didn’t know you are a Christian, and you aren’t a crazed, far-right Theocratic ‘christian.’

    I respect actual Christians, like you seem to be, ones the deserve capitalized ‘C’s and no quotation marks. Folks like you are drowned out in media by the right-wing Sharia Law crackpots, like Ken Hovind…

  23. jayyuma says:

    O.K.
    We disagree.
    Being a Christian, I can accept that, and move on.

  24. Moderator3 says:

    You lack knowledge of writing? Well, I guess you can always print.

  25. ComradeRutherford says:

    I am quite aware of what Sharia Law is, and my point stands: Sharia Law and ‘christian biblical law’ are almost completely identical. This is what far right “christians” are trying to bring to America. When you hear, “America is a Christian Nation,” they are talking about Sharia Law, just using a different name (just like christians and muslims use a different name for the same god).

  26. jayyuma says:

    Yea, and lots die weekly on the streets of our major cities. As do pro-life religious people, even Christians. Meaning what?! Nothing. People make the wrong choice every day. It’s just that Christians are more apt to acknowledge it, in MY opinion.

  27. jayyuma says:

    I’m happy to see that you are so well versed on our Lord and Saviour Jesus. My cursive knowledge is in opposition – but I’ll stay with IT!

  28. jayyuma says:

    Operative phrase, “as true to her Methodist beliefs as she ever was”.

  29. jayyuma says:

    For the record, Mr. Green, there are many, not a few, numerous, maybe even PLENTY of us out here who enjoy the conversion of Mr. Graham, even though we might be in agreement that he might not follow through. But – in the absence of a Trump or Cruz, you might just welcome in the beetch. Most of us will simply allow the cycle to flow, letting the water be wet, and the flame burn.

  30. jayyuma says:

    Comrade, just in case you’re not being facetious, and are not aware of sharia, the rule is 1) Convert to islam, 2) Pay the dhimmi tax (for not being muslem, or 3) Lose your head.
    Try living in Iraq for a year or two, for a clearer understanding.

  31. ComradeRutherford says:

    And this is different from Sharia Law, how?

  32. CherDash says:

    The ultimate price = death sentence. So you are saying babies should be killed because of someone else’s crime (rape/incest)?

  33. CherDash says:

    The ultimate price = death sentence. A baby should be killed because of someone else’s crime (rape/incest)?

  34. JaneE says:

    Abortion, and infanticide were both practiced in the time of Jesus, and same sex relations were very common, at least among men, in Roman Judea, yet he spoke not one word against either practice that has been recorded in either the canon or apocryphal gospels. When everyone has enough food, clothing and shelter, and everyone treats others with respect, decency and kindness, then we can start to care about the things that Jesus didn’t think worth mentioning.

  35. mononucleosis says:

    No! Of course, the mother should – Not!

  36. Houndentenor says:

    There are a lot of pro-choice religious people, even Christians.

  37. Mike_in_the_Tundra says:

    Let’s say a woman is raped and decides to deliver the baby around week 40. For a good reason, she can not take care of the baby and gives up her parental rights. Are you willing to finance the child’s upbringing until it reaches age 18?

  38. Mike_in_the_Tundra says:

    You may want to rethink the term “religious people”. Wicca is a religion, and it’s followers are religious people. I’m not sure, but I don’t think they have any position on abortion. Did you have a specific religion in mind?

  39. CherDash says:

    ‘Regardless how she became pregnant’ – so the baby should pay the ultimate price for the crime of another person. Hm.

  40. CherDash says:

    Religious people do not agree with murdering a baby in the womb.

  41. CherDash says:

    No matter what other words are used, the fact is that abortion is the murder of a human being.

  42. Houndentenor says:

    Not every religious person, not even all Christians, agree with your anti-abortion views. Clinton is as true to her Methodist beliefs as she ever was. What she’s not is a fundamentalist.

  43. BeccaM says:

    Not an ‘infant’ until after it’s been born. The terms are, in order: Egg, fertilized egg, blastocyst, implanted embryo, fetus, newborn, infant, and finally child. You can’t commit ‘infanticide’ — whether morally or legally — until after birth.

    Try again, forced-pregnancy advocate. You see, terms and accuracy in using them actually do matter. And there are lots of ‘deeply religious’ people who aren’t conservative fundamentalist Christians like yourself and who do not agree with your position that a fertilized egg actually has more civil rights than the sentient adult woman you would force to bring it to term, regardless how she became pregnant, regardless whether the pregnancy will harm or kill her, and regardless whether she wishes to be pregnant at all.

  44. CherDash says:

    Hillary is a devout supporter of infanticide (aka abortion). She has thrown away her ‘deeply religious roots’.

  45. woodroad34 says:

    So I reread and I caught the phrase : “launch an effort to influence the political process”. How persuasive can he be? His father had more influence than he does. He performed this same brattish screech with Wells Fargo a few months past over a gay ad (http://www.msnbc.com/rachel-maddow-show/franklin-graham-tries-vote-his-feet-again) only to go to another gay-friendly bank — a decision which he tried to unsuccessfully ameliorize: http://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2015/06/10/gay-wells-fargo-graham-boycott-column/71031300/

  46. woodroad34 says:

    In addition: Matthew 7:15

    “15”Beware of the false prophets, who come to you in sheep’s clothing, but inwardly are ravenous wolves.
    16″You will know them by their fruits. Grapes are not gathered from thorn bushes nor figs from thistles, are they?…”

  47. Colin says:

    “Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye devour widows’ houses, and for a pretence make long prayer: therefore ye shall receive the greater damnation.”

  48. BeccaM says:

    So Franklin Graham is a pandering, posturing liar, on top of everything else, including being a theocratic bigot who pines for America to become Jesusland. Am I surprised? Not at all.

  49. Hue-Man says:

    Until the anti-Muslim and anti-gay pogroms start,TeaParty/GOP is not fascist enough for Frank and his Talibangelicals. Increase your political activities. Maybe at some point the IRS will notice…

  50. woodroad34 says:

    Oh, please. He’s a shark, a snake, and a preying mantis all rolled into one. His income depends on this type of action.

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